Expats Eye Argentine Wine Industry

Argentina has only recently become well-known for its excellent wines, but now that the word is out it would seem no one can get enough, especially when it’s …

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Argentina has only recently become well-known for its excellent wines, but now that the word is out it would seem no one can get enough, especially when it’s so economically prices when compared to its international competition. Most expats interested in the Argentine wine business may not have enough capital to invest in a vineyard or a winery, but those with experience say it may be worthwhile to find a company with good prospects in which to invest. Appreciation for Argentine wines will likely only grow along with the country’s export business, and now may be the best time to get in on the action. For more on this continue reading the following article from International Living

You’ve probably heard the old joke that the best way to make $10 million in the wine industry is to start with $20 million. But these days in Argentina, nothing could be further from the truth.

Unlike other winemaking nations, Argentina is now exporting almost all the wine it can produce. Brazil, the United States, Canada and England are favorite destinations for emblematic varietals like Malbec and Torrontes.

The world just can’t get enough of high-quality value-priced Argentine wine—especially during these tough economic times. Even people from my hometown of Nashville, Tennessee, are coming down to Argentina in droves to learn more about the wine with which they’ve unexpectedly fallen in love.

From where I’m sitting in Mendoza, the heart of Argentina’s wine country, it looks like Napa, Barossa, and Bordeaux have become as passé as Merlot.

As a result of Argentina’s newfound popularity among wine lovers, there are many investment opportunities here. But I’m not going to tell you to plant a vineyard, build a winery, and export wine to North America or Europe. After all, new wineries are capital intensive, start-up costs are huge, and payoffs are long-term. Instead, you could buy into a well-run existing business that owes a large part of its success to wine and/or wine tourism.

It’s simply a matter of finding a quality business with great potential.

This article was republished with permission from International Living.

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