New Home Starts Up For Fourth Month In A Row In April

According to the U.S. Commerce Department and HUD, housing starts were up sharply in April over the same period last year. The seasonally-adjusted annual rate of privately owned …

According to the U.S. Commerce Department and HUD, housing starts were up sharply in April over the same period last year. The seasonally-adjusted annual rate of privately owned housing starts is over 40 percent above the number of housing starts in April of 2009, but there is some concern that the nearly 11 percent monthly drop in permits will slow future growth. The following article from HousingWire has more on this.

Housing starts were up in April, marking the fourth month of increases, according to a joint release by Commerce Department’s Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

According to the joint release (download here), privately owned housing starts in April were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 672,000. That’s up from the upwardly revised March estimate of 635,000 and is 40.9% above the revised April 2009 rate of 477,000.

Housing starts for the single-family sector were at a rate of 593,000 in April, up 10.2% above the upwardly revised March estimate of 538,000. The April rate for buildings with five or more units was 68,000, down 23.6% from March’s upwardly revised estimate of 89,000.

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Privately owned housing units authorized by building permits in April were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 606,000, that’s down 11.5% from the unrevised March rate of 685,000, but 15.9% above the revised April 2009 estimate of 523,000.

Single-family permits in April were at a rate of 484,000, down 10.7% from the revised March estimate of 542,000. The rate for buildings with five or more units was 103,000, down 14.9% from the revised estimate of 121,000.

Paul Ashworth, a senior US economist at Capital Economics, said much of the run-up in new construction was due to the homebuyer tax credit.

“The drop in building permits issued to 606,000, from 685,000, suggests that the latest rise in housing starts may be short-lived. Now that the tax credit has expired, we anticipate that home sales will drop back and that, consequently, housing starts will also fall,” Ashworth said.

Privately owned housing completions in April were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 769,000, that’s 19.2% above the downwardly revised March estimate of 645,000, but is 8.7% below the revised April 2009 rate of 842,000.

Single-family completions were at a rate of 564,000, up 14.6% from the downward revised March estimate of 492,000. The April rate for building with five or more units was 192,000, up 33% from the downwardly revised March estimate of 144,000.

This article has been republished from HousingWire. You can also view this article at
HousingWire, a mortgage and real estate news site.

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