Why UK Home Prices Could Stagnate In 2010

After rebounding in 2009, home prices in the UK are expected to stagnate in 2010 according to a Halifax report. Job woes have dampened demand — which was …

After rebounding in 2009, home prices in the UK are expected to stagnate in 2010 according to a Halifax report. Job woes have dampened demand — which was the driving force in the recent turnaround — while market listings are set to increase as a result of tax changes and improved prospects for sellers. See the following article from Property Wire for more on this.

UK residential property prices fell by 0.4% in May, the second monthly fall in a row, according to the latest house price index from the Halifax.

This follows a price fall of 0.1% in April but prices are still 6.9% higher than they were a year ago with the average house price is now £167,570.

It is the start of a slowdown that will leave the real estate market flat during 2010 as rising unemployment is curbing demand, according to Martin Ellis, Halifax’s housing economist.

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‘The mixed pattern of monthly price rises and falls so far this year is consistent with a slowing market and is in line with our view that house prices will be flat during 2010 as a whole. The relative recovery in house prices in 2009 was driven by a boost to demand from reduced interest rates combined with a lack of properties for sale,’ he explained.

He said that these factors have lost some momentum in recent months with rising unemployment curbing demand. At the same time, the pickup in market conditions last year has encouraged more homeowners to attempt to sell their property.

‘The recent suspension of home information packs and uncertainty about changes to capital gains tax may also be persuading more homeowners to put their properties on the market,’ added Ellis.

The index is in contrast to the one published a few days ago by the Nationwide which showed prices rose 0.5% in May and are now less than 10% below their 2007 peak. It also reported that the annual rate of house price inflation has dropped from 10.5% to 9.8% and prices are up 12.2% since their February 2009 trough.

But the indices have come under fire. They frequently offer a confusing picture of the state of the real estate market as they are subject to regional variations and the type of lending activity, according to Alison Beech, business relationship director at Spicerhaart, the largest independent network of estate agents in the UK and Europe.

‘In the grand scheme of things, these monthly indices should not be taken out of context and based on average house prices they are only showing a difference of around £1,500. Buyers and sellers should take more notice of what is going on in their local area than the overall UK picture presented by these indices,’ she explained.

Few analysts believe that the mini property market revival in recent months is sustainable as it is not underpinned by strong fundamentals. They point out that low stock levels and low interest rates are the driving force behind the rebound in house prices and sooner or later these conditions will change.

This article has been republished from Property Wire. You can also view this article at
Property Wire, an international real estate news site.

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